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20121010
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CSPAN
Oct 3, 2012 7:30am EDT
election season on record due in part to the supreme court citizens united decision. in this discussion panelists examine the effect that corporate spending has had on the campaign season. this is an hour and a half. >> good morning. good morning and welcome to the new america foundation. my name is mark schmitt. i'm a senior fellow at the roosevelt institute and a research fellow here at new america foundation. the vice president of new america and i have pulled together a good panel on what's really going on with money and politics in 2012. we call it beyond sticker shock because the idea is to kind of get beyond the basic idea of that huge amount of money here in politics. i remember when i first got involved in this issue in 1996 i was working on the hill, and my boss wanted to do a big speech. how outrageous it was, up to $1 billion would be spent on the election in 1996. of course, that begins to seem like the line from doctor evils demand for $1 million to not take over the world. so what i'm going to do here is a couple brief presentations and open it up to a panel discussion. t
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 7:45am EDT
before the 2008 election, olympia snowe, kathleen sebelius were both in there, and we wanted to also consider this notion -- barbara lee who has been are sober years ago when he did the last round of madam president, six years ago with her foundation a doctor looking at women governors would want to look at some of the women governors who have been through some of barbara lee's training as a pipeline to the presidency. >> we also made the observation that when a male is elected to senator schiff, immediately he is cast as a future presidential hopeful. for example, scott brown hadn't even been sworn in yet in massachusetts, and the url scott brown -- or scott brown twinkled.com was already purchased. but so many women have been in washington for so many years as legislators and working on important work come and get their names never bubbled to the top. we were curious why not. >> how did you decide you wanted to write this book? all three of you studied similar topics, but how did this book actually come about? >> your idea, ted. spent i guess it was my idea. i've been a political n
CSPAN
Oct 4, 2012 6:00am EDT
, it created a lot of debt we have to pay off. that's kind of our messaging. we try to hold elected officials to account for the record and also for the promises they have made. that's why a lot of incumbents don't like super pacs. >> we have an important note. one of the things we talk about is targeting. living here between new york and philadelphia media market you're not going to see any of these most likely. potentially pennsylvania has been a target state. neither campaign or the super pacs advertising in in sylvania. it's the most expensive market in the target states. i think it's also important to remember, there's a lot of money that is concentrated to a very small number of states and ultimately a small number of people as well. that's something i think is very important. a big part campaign finance reform and the unintended consequences. that's what my pet peeves is the unintended consequences sometimes as well intended legislation. we want to open up to questions. we will give maggie a chance to respond but i didn't want to become the moderator but somehow that may happen. but we
CSPAN
Oct 2, 2012 6:00am EDT
to the election of president obama and the real energy he brought on the campaign trail in 2008, to the question of transparency and the kind of good government i think we all envisioned. from my perspective, from about 2010, that energy at kind of dissipated. a lot of efforts have gone toward a lot of things, and we weren't seeing that sort of dramatic transformation that a lot of us can visualize. we can imagine knowing what the power of data is but it wasn't happening very much. and that caused me to do some work that i will describe your that results in some grades that i will talk about. grading is a cruel art but it sometimes is necessary art how we communicate things. what he did is i looked at the problem of sort of lacking transparency efforts around 2010, and it looked to me like maybe the transparency community have not communicated well enough to the government side. what it was we wanted. a lot of efforts have gone up if it didn't have a direction, didn't have a destination. and so i sat down with some technical people, i'm a lawyer so i have to go back and learn about how these com
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 12:30am EDT
person. someone who never sought elected officings and so he didn't do a whole lot to promote himself, although he lived a long life into the late 1800s, 1894 he died, but he retreated in the last 20 years of life into pretty much a private world and didn't promote himself. i also think that soon after the war was over, very soon after the war was over, much of the nation was guided by or inspired by a desire for reconciliation among whites, too bad for anybody else, and holt did not represent that point of view. he was very distressed at the repeated way the nation was unifieded and the former slaves' welfare was banded, and so he was a contrarian, and, again, didn't have a place in that narrative that was being created after the war, or a place for being celebrated in the way that the narrative was being developed after the war so he retreated, and he -- he was bitter, actually, at the end, but he sort of retreated to his private world, and he tried to reconstruct some relationships with family members, descendants of his own generation, nephew and niece in particular, and he clung
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5